Formerly, Wpoison was available only as a C language source code file which had to be compiled before use. The current version of Wpoison is now written in the widely used Perl language. Perl is an interpretive language that requires no compilation step. Because of the wide use and adoption of Perl as a language for web applications, Wpoison will henceforth only be distributed as a Perl program. The Perl version of Wpoison should be usable, without modification, on essentially every web server that supports Perl CGI programs.[1]

IMPORTANT: Please read about the copyright terms and conditions before downloading and installing Wpoison on your own Web site. Wpoison is free for all to use, but the copyright requires you to put a copy of the small Wpoison logo on the home page of your web site, and to make it be a hyperlink to this site. (Note that I provide detailed instructions for exactly how this should be done.) Think of this step as being the web equivalent of hanging a voodoo doll outside your front door. Hopefully, it will ward off the evil spirits!

Whenever you're ready, please proceed to download the Perl source code for Wpoison (6 KB).

(Before you download the source code for Wpoison, you may wish to see what an actual randomized Wpoison-generated web page looks like.)

NOTE that if you are installing Wpoison on any kind of Non-UNIXish type of system (for example any Microsoft Windows system or almost any kind of Apple system), you will also need to install a words file in the same directory as the Wpoison script file itself. If you are installing Wpoison on some Non-UNIXish system, download the Wpoison script file according to the instructions above, then download this zipped words file and save it into the same directory where you wll install the Wpoison script file itself. Last but not least, you must unzip the zipped (compressed) words file (words.zip) and place the resulting (unzipped) words file into the same directory as the Wpoison script file.

Please note also that even on some types of UNIXish systems, the Wpoison script may have some trouble finding a suitable dictionary (words) file in the standard directories where it looks for such a file. If you have installed Wpoison on some kind of UNIXish system, and if it produces errors that say anything about not be able to find a dictionary (or words) file, then you can fix this problem by downloading this gzipped words file, saving it into the same directory where you have installed the Wpoison script itself, and then running the GNU gunzip program on it to uncompress the words file.


[1] Note that Wpoison makes no use of any obscure or system-specific aspects of the Perl language. It is just doing some clever things with text strings and the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) protocol after all! The implication is that it should run just fine, right out of the box and with no modifications, on both MS Windows[tm] systems and on all manner of UNIX[tm] systems. Please let the author know if this turns out not to be the case.